Cleantech: Biodiesel, Solar and Wind


Some news today highlights Biodiesel, solar and wind technologies in the era of cleantech and renewable energy.

The first article discusses a study that was just completed in Ontario, Canada that analyzed the use of biodiesel as an alternative fuel source for agricultural use. This study, which was co-sponsored by the NRC, Environment Canada, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association, UPI Energy, and the University of Guelph, is hoped to accelerate the adoption of biodiesel use in on-farm applications across Canada. More at Evaluating Biodiesel Fuel For Tractors In Canada.

Solar power seems to still be behind in the race for the most cheap, and efficient technologies despite being around for a number of years. There are a few problems that need sorting out (listen here scientists, and business-types), “the development of complimentary technologies, in particular low-cost storage of electricity, is critical,” says Erin Baker, who is a scientist at the University of Massachusetts that led a USDoE study in the area. Baker’s other finding notes that government dollars won’t bring this technology to fruition along, and that private investment is needed in the manufacturing sector specifically; tax breaks, and public-private collaborations will also help to push this technology forward. The article “Cheap, Efficient Solar Power: What’s Needed Now To Get There? gives a great analysis that discusses the order of investment to develop solar tech:

  • Focus first on getting power from the new inorganic materials that show promise but are far from viable for large scale production
  • Then focus on purely organic cells with organic semiconductors; these hold the promise of low costs but still haven’t achieved high levels of efficiency and face serious stability problems
  • Last, investigate third-generation cells, which use entirely different technology but may ultimately yield much more power

Wind turbines are another fast-moving technology with much promise. So much so that Mitsubishi Ups Investment in Wind Turbines threefold to increase its wind turbine capacity to 1,200 megawatts / year by March 2009. As Paul Kedrosky points out, that is about two-thirds of what the city of Atlanta requires on a typical summer day.

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India Update: Finance Bill 2007


Some changes are going to happen in the finance communities in India. Their Finance Minister, Palaniappan Chidambaram, recently presented the Finance Bill 2007. PricewaterhouseCoopers put out an extensive report discussing the implications for Ireland, but also discusses many of the changes affecting overseas investments among other tax and investment changes.

India’s venture capital scene is highlighted by a tax pass through status eligible to foreign and domestic funds, as discussed in The Financial Express. What does this mean? It means that they are exempt from tax on income from investments in venture capital undertakings. However, this is not the case for all industries. This tax pass through is only applicable to investments in the IT, biotech and nanotech industries.

Another article in The Financial Express highlights a new clause put into Finance Bill 2007 surrounding gas distribution networks.

“A new clause (vi) inserted in sub-section (4) of Section 80-IA provides that any undertaking carrying on the business of laying and operating cross-country natural gas distribution network, including gas pipelines and storage facilities being an integral part of the network, will be eligible for deduction under the section if it is owned by a company registered in India or by a consortium of such companies or by an authority or a board or a corporation established constituted or constituted under any Central or state Act…” (Full text available at The Financial Express)

It isn’t surprising to see the Indian government giving special provisions to gas distribution networks. At the rate business enterprise and consumer wealth is growing in India, much more energy is needed; a more comprehensive network of gas distribution will be required to get the energy where it needs to go. This is backed by a huge demand in automotive vehicles. A news report from Hindu Busines Line mentions that Hyundai Motor India realized a 74% increase in domestic vehicle sales during February 2007 compared to the same month last year. This is complemented by a 60% increase from Honda Siel Cars India (HSCI), and an 81% increase from General Motors. Nice trend. Where are you putting your money?

Want to learn more about doing business in the new Indian economy, consider a few bestselling books to gain some insight:

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