Bacterial Cancer Therapeutics? Maybe.


A company called EnGeneIC in Sydney, Australia have created a targeted drug delivery platform based on “mini bacteria”, or as they call it, EnGeneIC Delivery Vehicles (EDVs). These vehicles look and behave like bacteria, including cell division — albeit, without chromosomes. I may need to dig a little deeper into the science of this one!

In any case, these EDVs have been shown to target tumorigenic tissue, being fed by blood vessels; 30% of an IV dosage reached the cancerous region within 2 hours. It has so far been proven safe in dogs with advanced non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as in pigs and monkeys.

The study also suggests that these EDVs can carry RNAi or siRNA-based products to their destination, as delivery of these nucleic acids has been proven difficult due to nuclease/enzymatic degredation before reaching its target.

Adapted from [NewScientist] from [Cancer Cell (vol 11, p431) “Bacterially Derived 400 nm Particles for Encapsulation and Cancer Cell Targeting of Chemotherapeutics”]

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At a Glance: RNAi Companies


I have stumbled upon a new blog, authored by Dirk Haussecker, a Stanford post-doc in RNAi-releated research. He put together a nice view of the companies operating within the RNAi space. Check it out.

Of all the companies, he highlighted Alnylam Pharmaceuticals for having a healthy IP portfolio surrounding their work in RNAi and microRNAs in humans. Keep on the lookout.