Twitter Update from Chirp


Twitter held their annual developer conference called Chirp on April 14-15th, and it gathered quite a crowd. I recently came across a great summary of Twitter’s latest stats, collected and published by Ben Lorica, a Senior Analyst in the Research Group at O’Reilly Media. Thanks Ben!

Here are some of the key take-aways:

1. Number of registered users: 105,779,710 (1,500% growth over the last three years.)

2. Number of new sign-ups per day: ~ 300,000 (More recently, 60% of new accounts were from outside the U.S.)

3. Number of new tweets per day: 55 million

4. Number of unique daily visitors to the site twitter.com: ~ 180 million. (That’s actually dwarfed by the traffic that flows through twitter’s API — 75% of traffic is through the API.)

5. Number of API requests per day: 3 billion

6. Number of registered apps: 100,000 (from 50,000 in Dec/2009)

7. Number of search queries per day: 600 milion

8. Twitter’s instance, of their recently open-sourced graph database (FlockDB), has 13 billion edges and handles 100,000 reads per second.

9. Number of servers: “… in the hundreds”

10. BlackBerry’s just released twitter app accounted for 7% of new sign-ups over the last few days

11. A NY Times story gets tweeted every 4 seconds.

Google Wave


Google announced “Google Wave” at the Google I/O conference last week. Google says that their technology is a new tool for communication and collaboration on the web, coming later this year.

After watching the video and speaking to a friend at the event, I think this product is going to be hugely successful for a few reasons.

1. VERY Open API
2. Widget architecture to allow plug-ins like Firefox allows for dynamic functionality
3. Multi-faceted use cases (consumer, prosumer, enterprise)
4. Google already has a massive reach
5. The technology allows real-time updates to multiple locations (i.e. edits or updates to a wave will be shown in real-time to friends, colleagues, and places that the wave may be embedded such as blogs or a website)
6. Drag and drop from desktop to web
7. Ease of adding and removing(??) Wave participants
8. Playback functionality of Waves (I am excited to see how this gets further developed)

If you are reading this, and are from Google, I would love an invite to the Wave sandbox to give it a trial pre-launch!

Watch the video at http://wave.google.com/